/page/2

ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This infographic about wlkable neighborhoods is part of a document called Planning Cities for People, which was prepared for the Chinese government. The document, which contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas, uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit.

ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This infographic about wlkable neighborhoods is part of a document called Planning Cities for People, which was prepared for the Chinese government. The document, which contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas, uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit.

(Source: alexinsd, via humanscalecities)

ilovecharts:

Next up, let’s talk about college: Women now make up the majority of college and graduate students. Nice work!
Since the mid-1990s:
A greater share of young women have obtained four-year college degrees than men.
The share of young women enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate study has increased.
Most 18 to 34 year-old students are enrolled in undergraduate programs, and the percent enrolled in graduate school has gone way up.
Today, the share of young women enrolled in graduate school is more than 25% higher than the share of men. Learn more about how President Obama’s fighting to make college more affordable for women (and men).

ilovecharts:

Next up, let’s talk about college: Women now make up the majority of college and graduate students. Nice work!

Since the mid-1990s:

  1. A greater share of young women have obtained four-year college degrees than men.
  2. The share of young women enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate study has increased.
  3. Most 18 to 34 year-old students are enrolled in undergraduate programs, and the percent enrolled in graduate school has gone way up.

Today, the share of young women enrolled in graduate school is more than 25% higher than the share of men. Learn more about how President Obama’s fighting to make college more affordable for women (and men).

ilovecharts:

Women have been doing some serious glass-ceiling cracking since the 1960’s. Young women are increasingly working in fields traditionally dominated by men.
Today, female college graduates ages 30 to 34 are just as likely to be employed as doctors, dentists, lawyers, professors, managers and scientists as they are to be employed as teachers, nurses, librarians, secretaries or social workers.
This is a big deal, and reflects the closing of a substantial gap. Women in the 1960’s were 7 times more likely to work in traditionally female occupations. Studies estimate that 15% to 20% of wage growth in the last 50 years was due to a decline in barriers to occupational choice.
So we’ve made a lot of progress, but clearly there’s more work to be done to get more women into predominately male-dominated fields and more men into female-dominated fields. For example, less than 20% of graduates in computer science and engineering are women, down from 37% in 1985. Reducing barriers to female occupational choice, including gender discrimination, would not only raise women’s earnings, but would also increase overall productivity by better matching workers’ skills to jobs.

ilovecharts:

Women have been doing some serious glass-ceiling cracking since the 1960’s. Young women are increasingly working in fields traditionally dominated by men.

Today, female college graduates ages 30 to 34 are just as likely to be employed as doctors, dentists, lawyers, professors, managers and scientists as they are to be employed as teachers, nurses, librarians, secretaries or social workers.

This is a big deal, and reflects the closing of a substantial gap. Women in the 1960’s were 7 times more likely to work in traditionally female occupations. Studies estimate that 15% to 20% of wage growth in the last 50 years was due to a decline in barriers to occupational choice.

So we’ve made a lot of progress, but clearly there’s more work to be done to get more women into predominately male-dominated fields and more men into female-dominated fields. For example, less than 20% of graduates in computer science and engineering are women, down from 37% in 1985. Reducing barriers to female occupational choice, including gender discrimination, would not only raise women’s earnings, but would also increase overall productivity by better matching workers’ skills to jobs.

ilovecharts:

Ok, let’s get back to wages.

The earnings gap between men and women still exists today, but since the 1970’s:

  1. Women’s hourly earnings have grown more quickly than men’s, following a similar trend to GDP growth.
  2. Growth in median family income has largely come from increases in women’s earnings, rather than from men’s earnings.
  3. Earnings for both married and single mothers increased by about 33%.
  4. Married mothers’ contributions to total family income increased from less than one-third to about 40%.

In other words, women are bringing home more of the bacon, but we still have more work to do to ensure equal pay for equal work.

beautifullyengineered:

Audi 2-Stage Series Turbo from a 3.0L TDI
What incredible packaging! I wish I had more information on this setup, but all I know is in the title.

beautifullyengineered:

Audi 2-Stage Series Turbo from a 3.0L TDI

What incredible packaging! I wish I had more information on this setup, but all I know is in the title.

chicagostudio20xx:

Christ Church by Eliel and Eero Saarinen 

chicagostudio20xx:

Christ Church by Eliel and Eero Saarinen 

33arquitectures:

Eero Saarinen, CBS Building,  New York, 1960

33arquitectures:

Eero Saarinen, CBS Building,  New York, 1960

mpdrolet:

TWA Flight Center, New York Idlewild Airport, New York, 1956–62 
Designed by Eero Saarinen
Balthazar Korab

mpdrolet:

TWA Flight Center, New York Idlewild Airport, New York, 1956–62 

Designed by Eero Saarinen

Balthazar Korab

subtilitas:

Eero Saarinen - John Deere Headquarters, Moline IL 1966. Via, 2, photos (C) Balthazar Korab.

(Source: snapshotd)

(Source: defenderblog)


ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This infographic about wlkable neighborhoods is part of a document called Planning Cities for People, which was prepared for the Chinese government. The document, which contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas, uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit.

ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This infographic about wlkable neighborhoods is part of a document called Planning Cities for People, which was prepared for the Chinese government. The document, which contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas, uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit.

(Source: alexinsd, via humanscalecities)

ilovecharts:

Next up, let’s talk about college: Women now make up the majority of college and graduate students. Nice work!
Since the mid-1990s:
A greater share of young women have obtained four-year college degrees than men.
The share of young women enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate study has increased.
Most 18 to 34 year-old students are enrolled in undergraduate programs, and the percent enrolled in graduate school has gone way up.
Today, the share of young women enrolled in graduate school is more than 25% higher than the share of men. Learn more about how President Obama’s fighting to make college more affordable for women (and men).

ilovecharts:

Next up, let’s talk about college: Women now make up the majority of college and graduate students. Nice work!

Since the mid-1990s:

  1. A greater share of young women have obtained four-year college degrees than men.
  2. The share of young women enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate study has increased.
  3. Most 18 to 34 year-old students are enrolled in undergraduate programs, and the percent enrolled in graduate school has gone way up.

Today, the share of young women enrolled in graduate school is more than 25% higher than the share of men. Learn more about how President Obama’s fighting to make college more affordable for women (and men).

(Source: theamericanlegacy, via airows)

ilovecharts:

Women have been doing some serious glass-ceiling cracking since the 1960’s. Young women are increasingly working in fields traditionally dominated by men.
Today, female college graduates ages 30 to 34 are just as likely to be employed as doctors, dentists, lawyers, professors, managers and scientists as they are to be employed as teachers, nurses, librarians, secretaries or social workers.
This is a big deal, and reflects the closing of a substantial gap. Women in the 1960’s were 7 times more likely to work in traditionally female occupations. Studies estimate that 15% to 20% of wage growth in the last 50 years was due to a decline in barriers to occupational choice.
So we’ve made a lot of progress, but clearly there’s more work to be done to get more women into predominately male-dominated fields and more men into female-dominated fields. For example, less than 20% of graduates in computer science and engineering are women, down from 37% in 1985. Reducing barriers to female occupational choice, including gender discrimination, would not only raise women’s earnings, but would also increase overall productivity by better matching workers’ skills to jobs.

ilovecharts:

Women have been doing some serious glass-ceiling cracking since the 1960’s. Young women are increasingly working in fields traditionally dominated by men.

Today, female college graduates ages 30 to 34 are just as likely to be employed as doctors, dentists, lawyers, professors, managers and scientists as they are to be employed as teachers, nurses, librarians, secretaries or social workers.

This is a big deal, and reflects the closing of a substantial gap. Women in the 1960’s were 7 times more likely to work in traditionally female occupations. Studies estimate that 15% to 20% of wage growth in the last 50 years was due to a decline in barriers to occupational choice.

So we’ve made a lot of progress, but clearly there’s more work to be done to get more women into predominately male-dominated fields and more men into female-dominated fields. For example, less than 20% of graduates in computer science and engineering are women, down from 37% in 1985. Reducing barriers to female occupational choice, including gender discrimination, would not only raise women’s earnings, but would also increase overall productivity by better matching workers’ skills to jobs.

ilovecharts:

Ok, let’s get back to wages.

The earnings gap between men and women still exists today, but since the 1970’s:

  1. Women’s hourly earnings have grown more quickly than men’s, following a similar trend to GDP growth.
  2. Growth in median family income has largely come from increases in women’s earnings, rather than from men’s earnings.
  3. Earnings for both married and single mothers increased by about 33%.
  4. Married mothers’ contributions to total family income increased from less than one-third to about 40%.

In other words, women are bringing home more of the bacon, but we still have more work to do to ensure equal pay for equal work.

beautifullyengineered:

Audi 2-Stage Series Turbo from a 3.0L TDI
What incredible packaging! I wish I had more information on this setup, but all I know is in the title.

beautifullyengineered:

Audi 2-Stage Series Turbo from a 3.0L TDI

What incredible packaging! I wish I had more information on this setup, but all I know is in the title.

subtilitas:

Renzo Piano - Maison Hermes, Tokyo 2001.

subtilitas:

Renzo Piano - Maison Hermes, Tokyo 2001.

chicagostudio20xx:

Christ Church by Eliel and Eero Saarinen 

chicagostudio20xx:

Christ Church by Eliel and Eero Saarinen 

33arquitectures:

Eero Saarinen, CBS Building,  New York, 1960

33arquitectures:

Eero Saarinen, CBS Building,  New York, 1960

mpdrolet:

TWA Flight Center, New York Idlewild Airport, New York, 1956–62 
Designed by Eero Saarinen
Balthazar Korab

mpdrolet:

TWA Flight Center, New York Idlewild Airport, New York, 1956–62 

Designed by Eero Saarinen

Balthazar Korab

subtilitas:

Eero Saarinen - John Deere Headquarters, Moline IL 1966. Via, 2, photos (C) Balthazar Korab.

About:

The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short
But in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark

Michelangelo Buonarroti

Occipital Lobe Stimulation

Following:

Sic
NPR